Arab Street, Singapore

 

Singapore: the furthest South that I have ever been. I had a lovely hostel on Arab Street, which was a nice quiet street with the Sultan Mosque at the end of it. Along this street were restaurants specializing in Arab foods and, on the other side of the Mosque were two rather popular restaurants: Zam Zam’s and The Victory House.

The Green Kiwi was a excellent hostel on Arab Street. It was within an easy walk to one of the bus terminals serving Kuala Lumpur and an LRT station. If I head to Singapore again, I would not think twice about reserving at the Green Kiwi.

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Having the mosque so close to the hostel was an additional benefit for me. Apparently, there are some hours that this mosque welcomes visitors during the day time.

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Nuevo Laredo and the Frontera: The Demonic

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This was inside a rather large chapel to the Santa Muerte along Mexico 85, just south of Nuevo Laredo.

Across all of Mexico, one can see small shrines, tattoos, jewelry, and small knick-knacks honouring this grim reaper figure known as the Santa Muerte. She is often venerated by the underworld and might be regarded as a patroness of drug cartels, hookers, and thieves. Despite this unsavoury following, there is a substantial and possibly growing number of devotees among Mexico’s otherwise law abiding citizens.

While in Nuevo Laredo during my several visits, I found a rather large and open following of the Santa Muerte.  While I never sought out these places, I came across them frequently on the roadsides, in businesses, and on the sides of peoples’ houses. One time, I saw a little shrine at the side of a residence. I asked the homeowner if I could take a picture and he invited me on his property to get a better picture. After I took a picture of the small figure, he showed me a shed beside his house which housed several large figures of the Santa Muerte.

While I consider myself a more intrepid traveler than most, I must admit that these places and that figure give me the creeps. Below are some pictures that I took at a chapel that I randomly happened across on the side of Mexico 85 as one leaves Nuevo Laredo. At this site, there were two buildings on a small property with a large statue of this figure between the two buildings.

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Devotees to this figure leave candles, write prayers, and leave offerings of cash, cigarettes, and liquor. It is interesting to note that, while churches are closed during the day, these shrines are wide open to anyone at apparently any time.

While I did go into the larger of the two buildings, I did not feel safe enough in that place to take more pictures of the exterior of it or the interior of the other building (which had only one entrance and exit). One must be smart and calculate risks, and I am always mindful of possible escapes when I wander into places that I am not expected to be poking around.

The pictures below are from the shrine located within the Zona Rosa.

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At the risk of sounding closed-minded, I have to say that my general impression of this figure and these places is that they are idolatry at its most open and blatant form. The fruits of this devotion are far from enviable and I am weary of anyone who wears this figure on themselves or sets up altars to the same.

While I cannot easily describe the feeling that I got in these places, I can say that it was not a pleasant one. I came, I saw, and I have no desire to go back.